Review: Station Eleven

Station Eleven. by Emily St. John Mandel, is an interesting read on how the end of the world, our world, affects the few survivors that remain.

I say “few survivors”, because a flu pandemic, known as the Georgia flu, has literally killed off about 99 percent of the entire earth’s population. The flu was transported and transpired in a matter of days, and for some in a manner of hours. The effects of the pandemic created a wasteland of sorts. Cars left on the highways and freeways, and roads to the airport. Some left empty, some with the deceased. There was no electricity, no gas that was usable, little food, and no comforts of home, obviously.

Survivors ravaged empty homes of everything they could use, leaving the interiors a shell of a house. People slept wherever they could. There was a bit of lawlessness, but not so much of that as there was a lackluster mood, a mood of concentrating on coping, and of traveling back to the past. The past was a big part of the story line, as it kept jumping from then to the current situation.

The memories never leave the survivors, and it is almost as if they are reliving their lives in a time warp or continuum through the past. There isn’t much hope emanating.

Learning to survive with basically no comforts is a central issue, and one that is consumed by a traveling Shakespeare company, created by a former actor. His role seemed to be a bit of a farce, in my opinion. He wasn’t entirely present in a majority of the novel, yet his presence was certainly felt by the survivors, as they tried to travel to where he was located. He reminded me of a mythical character, who sight unseen, manages to rule society through his former actions of legendary proportions.

I didn’t find the reality of the fact that art, in all its forms, became a central theme of the novel. For me, there were more immediate concerns that needed caring for. The basics of life were of vital importance in my way of thinking. I did not find that surviving in order to watch a traveling Shakespeare company was primary over other survival skills and necessities.

Yes, the plays and music brought cheer, but they also brought a sense of melancholy to those who watched. The past was revisited in their present.

An airport also plays a major role, as all aircraft was literally stopped, from the moment of the pandemic’s beginning. In fact a plane was grounded and quarantined due to sick passengers. It sat far removed from the airport, throughout the entire novel. The reader is cognizant of the fact that the dead passengers’ bodies are on the plane. Many survivors have chosen to live in the airport, portioning off sections and making the section their home.

Chaos is depicted in many forms, and I must say that the author was brilliant with her word-imagery. Every aspect of the landscape is described so the reader does not have to really think too long on envisioning what is being portrayed.

I won’t go on any more with my thoughts. If I do, I will then be rambling in a negative manner. The book has gotten mainly excellent reviews and awards, and I don’t want to spoil anything for you, a possible reader.

I read Station Eleven for a book club. It is not my usual story line read. Did I like it, yes and no, more on the negative side than the positive side. The book was dark, and unbelievable in sections, as far as I am concerned. But, I did read it all the way through. It does have a moral of sorts, which is a plus.

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