The Butterfly and the Violin

The Butterfly and the Violin, by Kristy Cambron is a story focusing on the Holocaust and a particular painting. The story bounces between pre-World War II, events occurring during World War II, and the current time period.

A painting of a woman, hair shorn, holding a violin, is the glue that bonds two specific individuals together, as they try to find out information regarding the painting, and locate the owner of it. During their research, they become deeply attached to each other. Each person has their own past, their own secrets they are withholding.

Unfortunately, the story did not speak to me, or have me gravitated to like any one particular character. I felt the modern day characters were weak, not realized and did not feel any attachment to them, and I thought they were lacking in substance and depth.

Their superficiality flowed throughout the pages. The relationships that develop, which include a young child, do not seem to be realistic, as to occurrences, within the relationships. The ending was extremely disappointing, and left me devoid of a final conclusion.

Some Holocaust-related truths were infused within the pages. Events and modes of operation were depicted, along with visuals that the reader could “see” before them. In that aspect, the word imagery was defining. Unfortunately, that information is colored by the novel deviating from the story, about one third into it, to include an overtone that over powers the Holocaust issue.

What I thought was going to be a serious novel regarding the Holocaust was more of a novel with loose ends, a novel not for readers who want an intense Holocaust story. The Butterfly and the Violin, by Kristy Cambron, in my opinion, would be better served as a book for teenagers and young adults (early 20s).

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Filed under Book Diva's Book Reviews, Holocaust History, World War II

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