Book Diva Review: Brave Genius

bravegenius Brave Genius: A Scientist, a Philosopher and Their Daring Adventures from the French Resistance to the Nobel Prize, by Sean B. Carroll, is a well-documented book regarding the lives of two particular individuals, Albert Camus and Jacques Monod. Each man was goal-oriented, trying to pursue their dreams during a time of extreme turbulence and upheaval in France.

The stories of each man encompasses other individuals responsible for their endeavors and for the safety of their lives when the two of them were involved in the French Resistance. The documentation of their involvement in the French Resistance is intense and often borders on too much information. Do not get me wrong, I am a history buff, and avid World War II book fan, but at times there were too many facts that I thought were unnecessary. I felt the length of the book, at almost 600 pages, could have been scaled down to 300-350 pages, and the story line would still have been adeptly told.

But, even with that, the book is a work of excellence in portraying the two men and their achievements that one would think not possible under the adverse circumstances. Brave Genius is a work of historical importance, in my opinion, and one that gives extreme and intense insight into how France dealt with the affairs of Hitler’s movement through the country.

Sean B. Carroll
has done the research, and provided the reader with a plethora of information. The intellectual writing brings the reader into the academic folds. The pages reveal a work of scientific exploration, and literary brilliance, as far as Camus and Monod are concerned. From philosophy to science, the pages reflect the endeavors and strivings to succeed beyond the normal inclinations. They also reveal the masterful writing of Sean B. Carroll.

I recommend it to all who have an interest in World War II, and in particular, French history.

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Filed under Blogrolls, Book Diva's Book Reviews, Holocaust History, Jewish History, Non-Fiction, World War II

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