Fire in the Blood, by Irene Nemirovsky

I was roaming through a book store a while ago, and I saw a the novel Fire in the Blood, the author Irene Nemirovsky, translated from the French by Sandra Smith. I quickly grabbed a copy, without even reading the inside jacket cover. I wanted the book, no matter what. I had been hoping that there would be another novel from her.

Nemirovsky authored the book Suite Francaise (actually two sections of a planned four-five-section novel). She never finished the book in its entirety, and therefore, Suite Francaise reads like two novellas.  For those who critique her work as not sounding complete, there is a reason for that…she died at Auschwitz at 39 yaers of age, before she was able to complete Suite Francaise (it was a work in progress), yet she kept writing until she was sent to Auschwitz, up until they came to her home, and knocked on her door. How many would do so?

What hits home for me, what strikes my inner core, is the fact that Nemirovsky wrote this book (along with Suite Francaise) just before she died (typhus is the claimed reason for her death) at Auschwitz. That she kept writing under the stressful and horrendous circumstances of knowing her life was about to end, speaks volumes.

I am certain will be another excellent read from Nemirovsky. Some books take preference over others, and the others can wait an extra day. I will let you know my thoughts when I am finished.

~~Book Diva

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1 Comment

Filed under Authors, General, Literature/Fiction

One response to “Fire in the Blood, by Irene Nemirovsky

  1. exeint

    I recently read your post about Irène Némirovsky and wanted to let you know about an exciting new exhibition about her life, work, and legacy that will open on September 24, 2008 at the Museum of Jewish Heritage —A Living Memorial to the Holocaust in New York City. Woman of Letters: Irène Némirovsky and Suite Française, which will run through the middle of March, will include powerful rare artifacts — the actual handwritten manuscript for Suite Française, the valise in which it was found, and many personal papers and family photos. The majority of these documents and artifacts have never been outside of France. For fans of her work, this exhibition is an opportunity to really “get to know” Irene. And for those who can’t visit, there will be a special website that will live on the Museum’s site http://www.mjhnyc.org.
    The Museum will host several public programs over the course of the exhibition’s run that will put Némirovsky’s work and life into historical and literary context. Book clubs and groups are invited to the Museum for tours and discussions in the exhibition’s adjacent Salon (by appointment). It is the Museum’s hope that the exhibit will engage visitors and promote dialogue about this extraordinary writer and the complex time in which she lived and died. Please visit our website at http://www.mjhnyc.org for up-to-date information about upcoming public programs or to join our e-bulletin list.

    Thanks for sharing this info with your readers. Let me know if you need any more.

    -Liz Sinnreich (executiveintern@mjhnyc.org)

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